Ideas/activities to help promote dignity

susan hiscock 10/10/18 Dignity Champions forum

Hi, my manager has asked me to be a dignity champion and to think of some ideas to help promote dignity I.e if resident is having personal care etc
Many thanks

Post a reply

Graeme Stark 10/10/18

Have a look at The Dignity Map on the Resources section of this website, it's a good starting point if you've not been there already.

Maggie Holliday 10/10/18

Hi....to maintain dignity, make the person feel at ease. Close the door. Shut curtains. Ensure you have privacy. If the person is able leave them to wash themselves but be close to hand if they require assistance. Encourage the to wash intimate areas themselves wherever possible. Only expose areas that you are assisting to wash at any one time. For example wash and dress top half first, then the lower half.

Dawn Martin 11/10/18

Hi where abouts are you. We are in Sheffield and run a support group for activity workers can we help with this even if it is sharing our meeting minutes.in the monthly sessions we share good practice and the activities we do ,we also link so that residents can make new friends..feel free to email our activities team for any info
[log in to view email address]

Sandra Reay 11/10/18

I agree with the above comments but I always find that the one thing that I see people forget to do is to ask permission before you start personal care tasks. Regardless of a persons communication ability it is still respectful to ask permission.
Other observations I have picked up if a person is supported 2-1 is that often the conversation is about what they did the night before and not a conversation that includes the person you are supporting.

mike stone 11/10/18

I am pretty-much an 'outside observer' on this one - but I really liked Sandra Reay's post.

Lisa Bateman 11/10/18

Hi I'm an out sided too but we was trained that u never complete any personal care tasks or anything that involves them without getting permission to do so first. We would be invading there personal rights and dignity

susan hiscock 11/10/18

They are all fab examples but my manager said about stuff like making notices to hang on doors telling staff to knock and wait for an answer I having personal care etc

Maggie Holliday 11/10/18

Hi...I think we have to think outside the box sometimes....it's about putting yourself in the position of the service user and thinking about how you would feel.

kevin SLATER 11/10/18

Notices to knock and wait should not be required,do we have then on our bathroom doors or bedroom doors,etc, we have locks etc if required. Dignity and respect should be inherent in most human beings and in the field of care giving should be constantly underpinned in your day to day work, your approach should not change form work setting to social setting, as for permission,again this should be second nature,never assume even if you know the client well, its about choices, giving people access, providing pathways if you cannot help directly, we all have as much right to say No as well as Yes.

susan hiscock 11/10/18

I understand that but some of the staff I work with do not. Thus having the idea of the door hangers

Neil Purcell 11/10/18

Always throughout the dignity pathway should be how the patient would feel when their asking anything of us the Care givers that we might not agree with.After all if we don't agree with their requests we can change the way we think about it in order to deliver patient centred care .

David Knapp 11/10/18

At Galanos house when new residents join us we put a welcome pack in their room and when completing the first parts of their care plan ask if they would prefer a male or female carer and if I am supporting a female resident with personal care even if I have helped them before I check that they are happy for me to help.

Sandra Reay 12/10/18

If signage is what you are looking for, maybe do it in a more person centred way. Depending upon your setting I would have a keyworker or meeting and discuss what is important to each person and put that on a poster or sign, you could change the sign after each meeting if the people you support felt that it had been achieved and move onto the next goal. It needs to be person centred. I wouldn't mind a sign on my door as long as it wasn't just for show and had a real purpose.
If the people you are supporting are not able to voice what is important to them you could complete the audit too and see what you need to improve on. Some people may not want a sign, make sure there opinion on the matter is heard.

Tania Hudson 15/10/18

I deliver training in dignity and do an exercise that you could try in a team meeting...

To prepare you will need:
- Incontinence pads
- Net 'knickers'
- Gloves

Activity

- Ask everyone to pair up with someone they feel comfortable with.
- Ask them to decide which one will be the care worker and which one the client.
- Give each 'care worker' a pad, nets and gloves.
- Ask them to take their 'client' to the bathroom and change them into their pads.

You will of course have people thinking its a joke so you need to try and keep a straight face and say that its a serious and important role play activity.

After a few minutes of people feeling mortified at the prospect you let them know that they don't really have to do it BUT ask the question of how it made them feel.

The good thing is that the 'care workers' feel as mortified as the 'clients' but do they ever feel like that when supporting their real clients - if not, why not? Why do we not feel a little embarrassed helping people with their personal care - do we just think 'they are used to it' or 'don't have the capacity to understand'? My opinion is if you feel you are feeling empathy towards your client you are more likely to go the extra mile in respecting their dignity.

Another quicker activity you can do in a team meeting is to ask everyone to go into the bag or pockets of someone they are sitting next to and take out a purse / wallet / phone...

Both activities can create a good discussion...